How to tell when coal slags are a problem

How to tell when coal slags are a problem

September 8, 2021 Comments Off on How to tell when coal slags are a problem By admin

Coal slags can contain mercury and lead and have been linked to several serious health problems including heart disease, stroke and cancer.

The problem is most commonly found in slag mines in Australia.

While slag miners are generally paid fairly, they’re also often paid poorly, particularly when it comes to overtime.

They may be paid a flat rate of about $8.20 per hour and receive $7.40 per hour for each shift.

However, because the mining industry doesn’t require workers to work for the full week, they may be underpaid.

In addition, they typically work more hours than regular miners, so there is a risk of fatigue.

“I work from 4am to 6pm, so I’m working six days a week.

You’d think if I’m going to do that, I should be doing it a little bit better,” said Chris.

I work really hard and it’s just not happening. “

The only way I’m getting over that is by not working so hard.

I work really hard and it’s just not happening.

It’s like a rollercoaster ride.”

Chris is a regular at Coal Slag Mines in Victoria, where he works eight-hour shifts on weekends and seven-hour jobs on weekdays.

He earns $8 an hour but said the majority of his pay goes towards overtime.

Chris said he didn’t want to complain to management about the overtime.

“When I was a teenager I was pretty angry with my parents, and I was very disappointed.

I had problems with my head, and my behaviour was just so out of line.

I was so angry,” he said.

“That’s where my parents came in, because they knew I was going to be a really good miner and they’d help me through it.”

Chris has been at Coal Shacks for a long time, but it was only last year that he started to question his future at Coal.

“A few months ago, I had a panic attack.

I got out of bed, looked at my watch, and it was midnight.

I thought, I don’t want this to be the last time I do this.

It got really bad.

I said, ‘I’m quitting’.

I don,t know, really know what to do.

I just sort of went out.

I don.t really know where to go.”

He says his experience has only made him more determined to get the word out about the problem.

“You don’t know where the next person is going to come from, you just don’t.

It doesn’t feel good to be sitting here, but I’m determined that it can be stopped,” he says.

“If we don’t make a change in the mining environment, then it’s going to continue.”

Chris said his family has never seen anything like the number of coal slagged in recent years.

“They’re a big part of our culture, and they’ve got a really strong connection to our community,” he explained.

“We don’t like the idea that people are going to lose their jobs.”

‘It’s really hard to make an informed decision’ For Chris, quitting coal mining has been the best decision he’s made.

“This industry is very, very good for the environment.

You can’t really compare it to other industries,” he continued.

“There’s a lot more sustainable jobs out there that don’t involve coal.”

In the end, he decided to continue working in coal mines and said he had no regrets.

“To me, I really wanted to stay.

I wanted to be employed, and if I wasn’t, I wouldn’t want it any other way,” he told News Corp. “But I know I’ve got some good friends that are still in the industry, and some of them are making a lot of money, so that’s a big plus.”

If you or anyone you know needs help, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit the Lifeline Support page.

The ABC’s Kate Stannard will continue to monitor the Coal Slags crisis.

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